Let us be truthful

The chapel hill murders were an act of terrorism. Let us be clear about that. The fact that mainstream media says so little about it is appalling. The fact that these three bright young inspiring people needlessly lost their lives is tragic and it is chilling.

To quote the ‘hits home sarcasm’ of Imam Zaid, a beloved American Muslim leader and teacher;

“Many are complaining of the lack of media coverage around this event. The sad fact is that the mainstream media that recently brought us “I am Charlie” has no interest in humanizing Muslims. The deceased were too full of life and positive energy to meet the stereotype of the evil, sneaky, not to be trusted Muslim. Why provide free humanizing coverage to the adherents of an evil ideology, hellbent on taking over the country. The smiles, vitality and genuine concern for others exhibited by the deceased will likely be dismissed asTaqiyya, self-serving deception.”

Please watch this video – this is what the vast majority of American and Canadian Muslims are like…these beautiful, hopeful, inspiring, courageous, proactive souls who are true assets to all around them. It is a great loss to the community and a wake-up call that Islamophobia is alive and well. Saluting Deah’s sister for her incredible resilience and her great generous heart to do this.

I will end with quoting another impressive young American Muslim, Hareem Mannan, who writes in her article “Blood on the Leaves: The Chapel Hill murders” published on VirtualMosque.com.

Should I call them and tell them not to go out today? My mother and sister, the two most important people in my life, my best friends, who just stepped out into the 32 degree outdoors that feels infinitely colder today? Will college campuses and malls in this country ever provide the type of safety for my mother and sister, both dressed in hijabs (headscarves), visible symbols of the Islamic faith, require? Is this the world that I will have to live in– one where I will spend the rest of my life worrying if my mom and my sister, myself and my friends, will make it home?

Or is this just about a parking spot, about a man who, as the New York Times described it, was involved in an altercation that was just a “lethal escalation of a neighborhood parking dispute”. Is this about questioning, as CNN puts it, “what role, if any, the victims’ faith played?” Is this about the fact that it literally took an international concerted effort on social media to even get this story to media stations, who still swiftly paint it with subtle pro-white, anti-Muslim propaganda?

Or is this about the fact that I am Yusor Abu-Salha. My sister is Razan Abu-Salha, and my fiance is Deah Barakat. We each carry their story with us, in our siblings, in our daily lives as American Muslims, and furthermore in our efforts to balance activism with school and deen (religion) withdunya (worldly affairs), to get married and play basketball and be with friends and cherish our parents, just as they did. Today I mourn the loss of such excellent human beings, and tomorrow I will don my hijab (headscarf) with a melancholy pride. And it will feel a little heavier, a little more difficult to wear, and as each of these Islamophobic tragedies adds to its gravity, I pray I never have to choose between hijab and life. I pray I never see the day I am not capable of bearing its growing responsibility. And I pray for the safety of all my Muslim brothers and sisters imprisoned by twisted perceptions of their religious beliefs in this land: the land of the “free”, home of the scared.

Deah Barakat, Yusor Abu-Salha, and Razan Abu-Salha will never be forgotten. Let their legacies be that of phenomenal human beings, beautiful people who touched the lives of so many through their selfless character and glowing personalities. Put their names down in our Muslim American history books; tell your kids about them: about these stunning human beings, victims of a war that most of the population pretend isn’t being fought every single day, martyrs in every right. Let them make du’a (supplication) with you every night that they are in the company with the very first victims of this senseless war against believers of this faith, Yasir and Sumayyah (may Allah be pleased with them), more than 1400 years ago– may Allah subhanahu wa ta`ala (exalted is He) allow them to join their ranks in Paradise.

Let their deaths not be in vain. Let them be the seeds they tried to bury that, instead, gave fruit to a revolution. Demand a re-visitation of the narrative that brands brown men killing over the loss of their countries, families, and homes as terrorism, and white men killing over parking spaces as just that. Demand a re-visitation of the narrative that causes our belief system or varied level of melanin to detract not only from our right to thrive, but also our right to survive. And bring the world to its feet: let everyone come to the realization that this was not about a parking space.

It was never about a parking space.

Please also read this article by Philip Gourevitch in the NewYorker. “The Chapel Hill Massacre Blues”

I have no words to say so I am sharing quotes. Perhaps I will save my energy for action and leave the words to others for now. But I have grown up in a country at war and racial conflict. I know it can take a mountain to move people’s minds…or it can take just a moment of true sincerity. Take a moment to think about what is happened and what is going on here. Let us be truthful, the whole story needs to be acknowledged.

We pray that people have access to sound knowledge, increase in wisdom, self-awareness and self-control and are able to be true.

Here is a charity page that Deah Barakat had set up. This dental school student was raising money for Syrian refugees in Turkey so he could provide dental care for them. http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/syrian-dental-relief/206249

Here is a petition that I pray you will sign

https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/declare-chapel-hill-shooting-3-innocent-muslim-american-students-terrorist-attack/HGfXFYH3

And here is a link where you can participate in a joint recitations/readings of the Quran, that we will do for the victims

Ending with a picture that I find beloved. Allah forgive all their sins and grant them the highest paradise, strengthen their families and give them fortitude during this difficult time.

As we say when we hear of any death; Inna lillaahi wa inna ilaihi rajioon…. from God we come and to Him we return

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‘Salawat’ – a musical tradition in Islam

Assalamu alaikum dear readers, peace be with you,

There is a great musical tradition in Islam, one that the West knows little of. One that spans a multitude of styles, genres and ages. From the deep rhythm of African drums to the mournful haunting melodies of Central Asia to the lyrically joyful sounds of the Indonesian percussion to the complex soothing majesty of the middle eastern Oud, Santoor and Violin, there has been a wealth of musicality in the Muslim world. Most of these classical traditions revolve around ‘salawat’ (=sending prayers upon the prophet, peace be upon him), and many are the lengthy poems and odes sung in every part of the world in praise of Muhammed, the beloved messenger (peace be upon him, his family and his followers). I will hope to collect a few of these genres together soon to give you a glimpse into this rich tradition.

There is a difference of opinion among Muslims as to the permissibility of Muslic in Islam. Islam is more commonly understood as a way of life among its adherents rather than a religion (see this post where I detail this better) and therefore everything in life has a law attached to it. The default state of everything is that it is permissible and only exceptions are forbidden. This is the classical scholarly understanding. The burden of proof always falls on rendering something invalid rather than the other way around. However I am sure all my Muslim readers would have come across the so called ‘haram police’ at least once in their life. These are the self-righteous self-appointed ‘scholars’ who would have you think that everything was forbidden and the burden of proof was on rendering validity (yet another symptom of the disease of lack of sound knowledge of Islam among Muslims nowadays). These people suck the joy out of life, and that is rather strange that they claim it is Islamic, when we know that the prophet (peace be upon him) was one of the most positive cheerful kind gentle accommodating of people, always smiling and always benevolent.

For myself, I have never found in my practice of Islam, anything except for joy, and that ever present sense of deep peace, which especially is strengthening during those difficult times that this life is bound to be peppered with.

So as to the permissibility of Music – the strictest opinion is that only using the human voice is allowed, the next lenient one is that the voice and percussion (some specify exactly which type of drum) is allowed, the next lenient one is that any instrument is allowed. However for all of the above, there is a consensus that the lyrics/message of the music must be ‘sound/wholesome/good/halal’. In other words ludity, lyrics that encourage impermissible actions, disturb the heart (e.g., violence, ugliness) etc. are to be absent in order for it to be allowable to partaken in.

About this difference in opinion – what is important to note is that scholarly difference of opinion is always respected and one may choose the opinion that suits one. One may disagree with another Muslim’s stance but one is not allowed to impose one’s way on the other. The latter point should be underlined, such is the sad state of lack of Islamic knowledge among Muslims these days that many do not know this principle, and a lot of unnecessary argumentation and much worse ensues. There are a vast number of issues upon which opinions differ in the Muslim’s life, and this is not a problem or should not be.

Music affects different people in different ways.  I have always found it healing and spiritually very uplifting. Someone once told me that ‘music is mathematics in motion’. This makes perfect sense to me. I have always adored mathematics…it is as they say ‘the language to understand the divine’ – of course mathematics will only lead us to a glimpse of divine truths, as a complete understanding of the divine is not possible in this lifetime given the limitations of our brain, and only God knows if it will ever be possible!

After all, while we all know that there is a concept called ‘infinite’ do we really *know* what that means? So can we really ever comprehend an infinite being? In mathematics it is proven that any number divided by infinity equals zero, and thus we say that anything or anyone compared to God, who is infinite, equals nothing! Hence the deeply spiritual person’s moving to a state of being devoid of  ‘ego’ (a good way to recognize a true teacher from a false one). This is why we also emphasize the oneness of God.. Mathematically, one (as in the absolute ‘one’..here I am talking about the concept of singularity) is the only number that cannot be divided…were it to be divided, it would not be one, and were it capable of being divided, then it would by definition have a limit, and what is limited is not infinite and hence cannot be God. These are some brief points to note on why mathematics has always been a cherished science in the Muslim world, and why Muslim scholars of old have recognized the power of music, being that ‘mathematics in motion’.

In the Islamic Golden age (when Algebra was invented) Muslim art always used geometrical patterns for that same reason – using pattern work to symbolize eternity and using the mathematical ratios of sides to symbolize the oneness of God. So that one who looks upon this pattern work is transported ‘out of the body, freeing the mind so as to catch a glimpse’…thereby making art a means to ‘know’ God, so to Islamic music has sought to transcend or elevate the limits of human consciousness.

That long preamble done, I wanted to share with you a piece from the ‘Firdous ensemble’. A very unique group of musicians who are blending different musical genres to produce what to me is a marvelous rendition of classical Islamic musical works. They are based in modern day Spain and strive to bring back to life the spirit of old Andalusia. A spirit some have argued this fractured world of the so called ‘clash of civilizations’ is much in need of rekindling. A place and time when people of different faiths, cultures and ideas lived and worked side by side, in what some historians have called was ‘the closest thing to paradise created on earth’.

So here is the Firdous ensemble. They are singing in praise of the prophet (peace be upon him)

They combine traditional and modern elements, even incorporating some celtic fiddle work in certain pieces! It’s best enjoyed with headphones. You can youtube more of their work, here are two clips I particularly like-

1. Salawat Dimashqiyya –

salawat = sending prayers upon the prophet (peace be upon him) and Dimashqiyya = from Damascus. It must be an ancient piece, or perhaps it is their name for it. I will translate what I can for your enjoyment and better appreciation below;

Begins with recitation from Quran, Surah 49, ayat 13 and Surah 33, ayat 56

49:13
(Quran 49:13) Sahih International Interpretation

O mankind, indeed We have created you from male and female and made you peoples and tribes that you may know one another. Indeed, the most noble of you in the sight of Allah is the most righteous of you. Indeed, Allah is Knowing and Acquainted.

33:56
(Quran 33:56) Sahih International Interpretation

Indeed, Allah confers blessing upon the Prophet, and His angels [ask Him to do so]. O you who have believed, ask [ Allah to confer] blessing upon him and ask [ Allah to grant him] peace.

@min 2:24 various salawat in Arabic…

refrain – “la ilaaha illallaah” = there is no God but God

@min 5.56 – singing in turkish (?)

@min 6.14 chorus –

“hasbi rabbi jallalah, maafi qalbi ghairullah = sufficient is my Lord, the majestic, for me, there is none in my heart except God/

“nur Muhammed sallallah, la ilaaha illallah” = The light of Muhamed (peace and blessing be upon him), there is no God but God.

refrain – “la ilaaha illallaah” = there is no God but God

end – “Muhammed rasullullah” = Muhammed is the messenger of God.

A recitation of the opening chapter of the Quran, Al-Fatiha = ‘the opening’ is given at the end as is often customary.

2. Madha Morisco – Morisco was the name give to Muslims who lived in Spain after the Reconqista. The video has subtitles and and an explanation. This one I find rather poignant, as there is some reason to believe I may have partially descended from the Moriscoes. Perhaps this geneticist should sequence her genome to find out! Enjoy 🙂